City of Forsyth

Download the Visitors Guide for comprehensive information about our city.
fcvb-about-city-featured Healing and renewal. That’s why confederate soldiers came to Forsyth during the Civil War: to seek care and respite at the first hospital of its kind during the battles in and around Atlanta. And that’s one reason why people visit our city today: to relax and renew in this charming and hospitable town.

Sheltered from the hustle, bustle, and traffic of nearby Atlanta and Macon, Forsyth is a pre-Civil War town that has maintained its stunning 19th century antebellum architecture. Take a stroll along the tree-lined streets of the historic downtown square, listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Savor fried green tomatoes from the famous Whistle Stop Café in Juliette (Yes, that Whistle Stop Café) or enjoy a meal at the award-winning Grits Café.

From unique antique shops and one-of-a-kind boutiques to adventurous outdoor activities, Forsyth has something for everyone. Slow down and take your time enjoying everything the city has to offer. For help planning your trip and finding our city’s hidden gems, stop by the Welcome Center and talk to our friendly and knowledgeable staff.

Take a deep breath, let yourself relax, and stay for a while. You’re in a place that gives meaning to the words “southern hospitality.” We bet you’ll love it here as much as we do.

History of Forsyth, Georgia

Forsyth was founded in 1822 and named after John Forsyth, a prominent political leader. The first passenger railroad in Georgia connected Forsyth to Macon, 25 miles south. Later, the Central of Georgia Railway tracked through Forsyth. Today, the city’s historic museum is located in one of the old train depots.

Two Civil War confrontations occurred near Forsyth: a skirmish at Towaliga River Bridge on November 17, 1864 and the Battle of Culloden on April 19, 1865. Soldiers fought the Battle of Culloden 10 days after the end of the war, because word of General Robert E. Lee’s surrender hadn’t reached the town yet.

During the battles in and around Atlanta, Confederate soldiers were sent to a hospital camp in Forsyth for medical care. As a result, 300 soldiers are buried in the historic Confederate cemetery in Forsyth.

Forsyth was also home to Tift College, a women’s college originally named Forsyth Female Institute. Today, the college houses the Georgia Department of Corrections. For more information about Tift and to take an interactive tour, download the Tift College Renaissance Tour app for iPhone or Android.

In 1900, William Hubbard started the first school for African American children in Forsyth. Seven students met at Kynette Methodist Church. Forsyth Normal and Industrial School expanded over the next 15 years and was one of only a handful of senior high schools in Georgia for African Americans. After much success and several name changes, the school closed in 1938. However, Hubbard’s and the school’s legacy remains.

As of the 2015 census, Forsyth’s population was 4,004.

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